Green Energy Companies Admit Requiring Chinese Goods To Survive

Because of their heavy dependence on low-cost Chinese suppliers, officials in the green energy sector are panicking as Congress moves ahead with measures that would put hefty taxes on Chinese solar panels.

Because of their heavy dependence on low-cost Chinese suppliers, officials in the green energy sector are panicking as Congress moves ahead with measures that would put hefty taxes on Chinese solar panels.

On Friday, the House unanimously approved a measure supported by both parties to reinstate duties on Chinese solar cells exported from Southeast Asia.

These tariffs were temporarily lifted by President Joe Biden to meet the need for sustainable and clean energy. 

Some Democrats in the Senate have already expressed their support for the bill, indicating that it has a good chance of being passed.

It would be a catastrophe for the renewable energy sector if that happened.

According to a report, current projections for growth indicate that by 2025, China will control 95% of the world’s manufacturing.

Over the past decade, China has surpassed Europe, Japan, and the United States as the primary PV panel producer for commercial and residential applications.

In a statement released last Friday, the Solar Energy Industries Association acknowledged that America could not manufacture sufficient solar panels to meet needs. The Solar Energy Industries Association and American Council on Renewable Energy have warned that tariffs would be catastrophic.

China’s solar energy industry has given unlawful subsidies to solar companies for years, giving them an advantage over the U.S.  China avoided U.S. taxes on solar imports by routing shipments via several Southeast Asian countries. These countries included Vietnam, Cambodia, and Malaysia.

Tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese imports were announced by then-President Donald J. Trump in 2018.  These levies aimed to get China to stop engaging in unfair practices related to innovation and technology. Tariffs were also an important first step in redressing the imbalance in our trade with China.